Category Archives: 2013

The ONE Ball 2013 – The Stars & Entertainment

19 Aug 2013 (1)Thank you to our Entertainers

Hosted by The Legendary Duo

The Flying Dutchman

19 Aug 2013 - 2 (2)

Vernetta Lopez

19 Aug 2013 - 2 (3)

Performances by

Rob Collins

19 Aug 2013 - 2 (4)

The Trisno Trio

19 Aug 2013 - 2 (5)

Ishtar Bee

19 Aug 2013 - 2 (6)

Clifford ThePartyman

clifford

ONE (SINGAPORE) is a non-profit organisation dedicated to raising public awareness and taking concrete actions to Make Poverty History and create The World We Want, a just world where no one is poor. Our initiatives include public forums, film screenings, food aid projects and ‘Concrete Action Programmes’ that link individuals and companies with organisations working to assist and empower impoverished communities.

ONE (SINGAPORE) is currently funded by the ad-hoc generosity and goodwill of our supporters. You can help us have a greater impact.

Come dressed as a Legend, enjoy dazzling performances and dance the night away! Prizes for the Best Dressed, amazing celebrity memorabilia and holidays on auction, plus meet the winners of the inaugural ONE (SINGAPORE) Awards for community and corporate heroes. All in ONE Legendary Evening!

With a stronger foundation and your kind support, we can do more to achieve our goals of raising awareness and taking concrete action to Make Poverty History.

Additional Information:

The ONE Ball – Thank You to Our Sponsors

19 Aug 2013 (1)

Thank you to our Sponsors

The ONE Official Sponsor

19 Aug 2013 (2)

Official Venue Partner

19 Aug 2013 (3)

Official Events Management

19 Aug 2013 (4)

Norbreeze

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LASplash Cosmetics

19 Aug 2013 (8)

The Fabulous Baker Boy

19 Aug 2013 (11)

Fitness Buffet

19 Aug 2013 (5)

Zardoze

19 Aug 2013 (9)

Bread5 Studio

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Kim Robinson

19 Aug 2013 (6)

LAMC Production

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Frame316

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GroXers

19 Aug 2013 (7)

The Studio Loft

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Daughters Of Tomorrow

19 Aug 2013 (14)

ONE (SINGAPORE) is a non-profit organisation dedicated to raising public awareness and taking concrete actions to Make Poverty History and create The World We Want, a just world where no one is poor. Our initiatives include public forums, film screenings, food aid projects and ‘Concrete Action Programmes’ that link individuals and companies with organisations working to assist and empower impoverished communities.

ONE (SINGAPORE) is currently funded by the ad-hoc generosity and goodwill of our supporters. You can help us have a greater impact. Please click here for more information and details on sponsorship packages.

Please click here for more details on sponsorship packages.
With a stronger foundation and your kind support, we can do more to achieve our goals of raising awareness and taking concrete action to Make Poverty History.

For more information on Sponsorships, please contact Cynthia at cynthia@onesingapore.org.

Additional Information:

EU Nations urged to implement Robin Hood tax

By Melissa Chong

ONE (SINGAPORE) has joined hands with more than 350 civil society organisations from around the world, urging the heads of 11 European countries to implement a Financial Transactions Tax (FTT).

This comes after the European Commission announced plans to severely scale back the FTT, amid opposition on the economic damage it could cause.

5 Aug 2013

But civil society groups continue to argue that a Global tax of just 0.05% on financial transactions could raise up to US$650 billion a year, channeling much-needed funds to fight global poverty and climate change.

They urge that the tax could also dis-incentivize risky speculation and short-term trading, which poses high risks to economic stability. A Europe-wide FTT could set the precedent for reforming the financial sector, which has so far been exempted from the contributing to the common good.

The 355 signatories to the letter include Oxfam International, Greenpeace, WWF International and the World AIDS Campaign. A copy of the letter was sent to Algirdas Šemeta, the European Commissioner in charge of tax policy, who said she was impressed with the level of international support for the FTT. The special advisor of French President, Francois Hollande, has also agreed to pass the letter on to Hollande.

Seven months ago, Germany and France led nine other countries – Italy, Spain, Austria, Portugal, Belgium, Estonia, Greece, Slovakia and Slovenia – to press ahead with the levy, having failed to persuade all 27 EU members to sign up.

The financial lobby continues to attack the levy, raising alarm bells about the economic damage it could cause to industry, jobs and finances. Britain remains fiercely in opposition, believing the levy would drive business from London to New York instead. Sir Mervyn King, Bank of England Governor, said he “could not find anyone within the central banking community who thinks it is a good idea.”

Amid the criticisms, the European Commission announced in July 2013 that it is prepared to consider a redesign of the original proposal. It may now be rolled out six months later than the intended start date of January 2014. The levy could also be reduced by up to 90%, raising just a fraction of the amount hoped.

As the debate in Europe continues, it is likely that anti-poverty campaigners will continue to lobby relentlessly for the Robin Hood Tax to be implemented in full. David Hillman, a spokesman for the Robin Hood Tax campaign, said: “There remains a firm intention to agree to a strong FTT that will be popular with the public and raise tens of billions from the banking industry.”

This article was edited by Michael Switow

ADDITIONAL RESOURCES

Robin Hood Tax, Not Corporate Greed, Should be Focus of Climate Finance Meeting, Say Activists

By Lacy MacAuley and Janet Redman

30 Apr 2013 (1)

Chanting, “Human need, not corporate greed! Robin Hood Tax now!” protesters dressed as polar bears, farmers, and bankers engaged with officials entering the meeting to urge them to support a Robin Hood Tax.

Robin Hood Tax campaigners converged on Washington, DC, where officials from the finance and climate ministries of select developed countries met to discuss how to mobilize private sector investment in developing countries to address climate change. Chanting, “Human need, not corporate greed! Robin Hood Tax now!” protesters dressed as polar bears, farmers, and bankers engaged with officials entering the meeting to urge them to support a Robin Hood Tax.

30 Apr 2013 (2)

demonstration drew attention to the fact that trillions of dollars of public money have been spent to bail out Wall Street while government officials pay short shrift to untapped and extremely promising innovative sources of public money like a Robin Hood Tax. In doing so, officials risk putting corporate profits over the needs of climate-impacted people.

Both the financial crisis and the recession have left a massive hole in public finances, threatening job creation, community services, and the ability to address climate change. While Wall Street has already bounced back, ordinary people are still trying to recover from problems caused by corporate abuse in the financial sector. The Robin Hood Tax calls for the institution of a small tax of less than half of one percent on Wall Street transactions in order to generate many billions of dollars each year toward crucial public goods and services, like healthcare, education, and helping the world’s poor confront the climate crisis.

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Vernetta Lopez’s speech as outgoing President of ONE (SINGAPORE)

15 Mar 2013

This is our 8th AGM and I’m very proud of where ONE (SINGAPORE) is now.

It’s been such a pleasure watching the society grow with its different events and benchmarks. We’ve identified our strengths and continue to do what our mission requires: to spread awareness and take concrete actions to Make Poverty History.

And we’ve progressed in our mission through various film series’, through dialogue sessions where we’ve had luminaries join our panel like Mdm Yacob Ibrahim, Bridget Tan and Braema Mathi.

And through 2 different benchmarks to make a tangible difference in peoples’ lives. Our Everyone Can Warehouse Sale where everyone was invited to purchase a list of items for our designated charity, and our One Singapore Food Drive where droves of cars with generous citizens helped us to raise several thousands of dollars worth of food for the needy.

Our efforts have also grown with the help of amazing corporate partners who have demonstrated an amazing CSR spirit. Like Schneider Electric, Lenovo, GPS Azea and Dimension Data, Pernod Ricard to name a few, especially so through CAP, our Corporate Adoption Program.

My role with ONE (SINGAPORE) has been a small but meaningful one and I’m not being self-effacing. Nope. Because I’ve been working with a team of truly amazing, hard working, self-sacrificing, passionate, earnest, exceptional, impassioned, fun bunch of people, who have made every event meaningful, and given so much of their time, and truly their personal lives, to make every event that ONE (SINGAPORE) does, count.

It’s been my absolute honor to be a part of this and having been President for 5 years, I feel it is time to pass the baton onward, to keep the spirit growing with fresh ideas, new inspirations and perspectives.

So as of today I officially step down as President and pat down the seat, to make way for a new President to take the reigns and gallop into a new frontier, to go where no President has gone before.

I’m a Star Trek fan.

Our President Elect is someone who is passionate, talented, vocal and is very active within her personal and professional life. And if she is elected, I am very sure she will do an excellent job at bringing ONE (SINGAPORE) forward!

I will still be an active volunteer and member of ONE (SINGAPORE) especially so with my links within the media.

I would like to especially thank Michael Switow, Co-Founder of ONE (SINGAPORE), his invaluable advice, amazing persistence, incredible integrity and never dying innate spirit to help. And that goes for the Exco as well.

I really wish to thank the Exco for putting up with me, for allowing me to take us into new projects and different directions, and for supporting me in so many ways. I apologize for anything that I may have done wrong. I truly am grateful for your partnership and amazing energy and spirit. And I wish you a continuing and fruitful journey towards Making Poverty History.

Thank you and have a great 2013!

Watch her speech

Building on the Momentum of the MDGs

By Michel Anglade

13 Mar 2013 (1)

Since the adoption of the UN Millennium Development Goals in 2000, we have seen improvements to the lives of millions globally. About 600 million more people have been lifted out of poverty, 56 million more children are going to school and millions of households have access to clean water.

Indeed, these successes prove that political will and commitment to set goals can bring about real change. And as the 2015 deadline for these UN MDGs loom, the international community must start critically reviewing these goals and discuss what the next commitment period will bring.

That is why Save the Children, along with ONE (Singapore) and the Singapore Institute of International Affairs, held a panel discussion on February 15th, 2013 to discuss the opportunities and challenges in the Post-2015 MDG agenda. During this discussion, Save the Children presented its report ‘Ending Poverty in Our Generation’, which lays out our proposal for the post-2015 agenda. Beyond these suggestions, however, it is my belief that we should first lay down the key principles to which these goals should be written.

Firstly, are all children given a fair chance to survive and thrive? Despite huge reduction in absolute poverty numbers, inequality has been on the rise. Save the Children’s ‘Born Equal’ report, published last September, showed that the overall gap between rich and poor children, globally, has grown by 35% since 1990 – nearly double the gap between adults – meaning that in some countries more than twice the number of poor children die before the age of five than rich children. Progress needs to reach the poorest 20% before we can safely say that all children have been given a fair chance to survive and thrive.

Secondly, Post-2015 goals cannot be seen as separate targets for separate sectors because they are inextricably linked; instead, they need to be seen as parts of a whole. A hungry child is less likely to go to school and achieve good learning outcomes; he is more likely to fall ill; and as he are also more likely to be poor, he will have less access to health services, clean water, nutritious food for physical and mental development and the result is a vicious cycle of poverty for generations to come.

13 Mar 2013 (2)

During the panel discussion, Michael Switow pointed out – and quite rightly so – that perhaps indicators are not enough for development. A child that has US$1.26 (US$0.01 more than the agreed target) could be considered ‘lifted out of extreme poverty’, but 10% inflation means that they would just be as food insecure as they were before. Instead, a rights-based approach could be necessary to ensure that women and children have access to what they need in order to survive and thrive. This is very much in line with Save the Children’s vision of a world in which every child attains the right to survival, protection, development and participation. Every child must have access to schools, clinics, social protection, nutritious food and a voice.

Accountability should be at the core of the framework. In order to hold world leaders to their promises, we need a robust accountability mechanisms rooted in regular collection of disaggregated data in order to track progress, all of which require investment and resources from the state.

Lastly, environmental sustainability of development is crucial as human health, survival and activities are dependent on our earth’s natural resources. Increased environmental exploitation is often viewed as a necessary process in development as people require more fuel, food and other material goods like electronics. And little has been done to improve the sustainability of our world. Of the 20 countries most at risk from climate related disasters by 2015, 19 have large numbers of absolute poor. As such, development projects should at the core of it, be built around environmental sustainability and low-carbon development.

13 Mar 2013 (3)

development may not be limited to the environment. Investment in women, for instance, will go a long way in sustaining development. As Georgette Tan said: “Women need to be empowered: They need an education to start, they need access to a bank account, access to finances and credit. They need to be given access to technology and they need to understand that they have a role to play…It’s about giving them the leg up, not just about the hand out.” Indeed, the case for investing in women has been made many times over; 90% of women’s income is reinvested in her families as opposed to about 40% of men’s income. Women invest in their communities, which helps create many more opportunities for other women and children in those communities.

Millions have benefitted as a result of the Millennium Development Goals. Let us capitalise on this momentum so that 6.9 million children no longer die each year from preventable causes, 300,000 mothers do not die needlessly, and millions of hungry have access to the nutritious foods they deserve.

Save the Children’s report, ‘Ending Poverty in Our Generation’, can be downloaded here.

Michel Anglade is the Campaigns and Advocacy Director at Save the Children Asia

Impressions from the ONE Food Drive

By Melissa Chong

Cars stream in during an 8-hour food drive, greeted by ONE (SINGAPORE) volunteers and Class 95FM DJs Vernetta Lopez, Jean Danker, Glenn Ong and Marilyn Lee. The DJs are visibly touched by the overwhelming generosity of donors opening their hearts as well as their wallets.

The event – The ONE Food Drive – is organised by ONE (SINGAPORE) with the support of Class 95FM to collect food for the hungry.

Wait – hunger in Singapore?

23 Jan 2013 (1)

“It’s amazing, I didn’t realise our car boot could fit so much stuff!” chuckle a group of ladies while unloading thirteen sacks of rice into the warehouse. They vouch that they are loyal Class 95FM listeners who heard the radio announcement and emptied the shelves of a NTUC supermarket to help out.

Joseph Sim, a father of two young children, also hit the stores the same day after hearing the radio announcement. He arrives with bags of assorted groceries worth $480.

“I wanted to teach my children from a young age that we should donate when we can”, he tells us.

Jointly organized by ONE (SINGAPORE) and Class 95FM, a publicity campaign including social media has been launched to encourage the donation of non-perishable food items to the those in need.

“We traded a few ideas and decided – let’s start with something really basic which people can grasp, something which everyone can get involved in. So we said ok, let’s tackle hunger”, explains Michael Switow, co-founder of ONE (SINGAPORE).

And yes, hunger does exist in prosperous Singapore. While there are no official statistics, a commmunity survey by Food for All in 2009 noted that some 12,000 Singaporean households rely on supplementary food rations provided by Family Service Centres, Residential Committees (RCs) and charities.

Food items collected in the drive are being given to two beneficiary group: The Food Bank Singapore and Willing Hearts.

“ONE (SINGAPORE) would like to bring attention to groups which don’t receive as much attention”, Michael adds.

Bulk items collected in the food drive are donated to Willing Hearts – a local soup kitchen that cooks 3,000 meals for various distributions points across the island, every day of the year. To run operations at such a massive scale, they depend heavily on the goodwill of donors and say the food collected through this drive will go a long way.

“It’s about one-months supply of food. From here, the food will go to our kitchen. We’ll serve meals to old folks, the sick, single parents and jobless. Many live in one-room, two-room flats. It’s a wide range of people”, says Charles Liew, Treasurer of Willing Hearts.

Assorted bags of food collected in the drive are donated to The Food Bank Singapore, which partners with a broad range of charities and volunteer welfare groups to distribute food to families and individuals in need. Although operations started in April 2012, this organisation is already a media sensation, receiving recognition in the 2012 National Day speech.

23 Jan 2013 (3)

According to The Food Bank Singapore, corporate donors often want to donate food in bulk but beneficiaries rarely have sufficient storage space.

“Because of our linkage with FoodXervices, we can settle the logistics of sending the food to beneficiaries. For example, recently a company donated 250 cartons of French fries. Where is the charity going to store it? That’s when we come into the picture,” explains Michael Teo, a co-ordinator at The Food Bank Singapore.

A convoy of 25 to 30 cars arrives from Schneider Electric, a multinational electric engineering company, pledging more than $10,000 worth of food. Not long after, a truckload arrives from Nestle with cartons of Nestle products including Milo, Nestum cereal and Maggi noodles.

The food collected is helping thousands of individuals from the unemployed to the elderly and making a clear stance that no one in Singapore should go hungry.

This article was edited by Emma Gatehouse. Photos by Joy Wong.

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And yes, hunger does exist in prosperous Singapore. While there are no official statistics, a commmunity survey by Food for All in 2009 noted that some 12,000 Singaporean households rely on supplementary food rations provided by Family Service Centres, Residential Committees (RCs) and charities.

Food items collected in the drive are being given to two beneficiary group: The Food Bank Singapore and Willing Hearts.

“ONE (SINGAPORE) would like to bring attention to groups which don’t receive as much attention”, Michael adds.

Bulk items collected in the food drive are donated to Willing Hearts – a local soup kitchen that cooks 3,000 meals for various distributions points across the island, every day of the year. To run operations at such a massive scale, they depend heavily on the goodwill of donors and say the food collected through this drive will go a long way.

“It’s about one-months supply of food. From here, the food will go to our kitchen. We’ll serve meals to old folks, the sick, single parents and jobless. Many live in one-room, two-room flats. It’s a wide range of people”, says Charles Liew, Treasurer of Willing Hearts.

Assorted bags of food collected in the drive are donated to The Food Bank Singapore, which partners with a broad range of charities and volunteer welfare groups to distribute food to families and individuals in need. Although operations started in April 2012, this organisation is already a media sensation, receiving recognition in the 2012 National Day speech.

23 Jan 2013 (3)

According to The Food Bank Singapore, corporate donors often want to donate food in bulk but beneficiaries rarely have sufficient storage space.

“Because of our linkage with FoodXervices, we can settle the logistics of sending the food to beneficiaries. For example, recently a company donated 250 cartons of French fries. Where is the charity going to store it? That’s when we come into the picture,” explains Michael Teo, a co-ordinator at The Food Bank Singapore.

A convoy of 25 to 30 cars arrives from Schneider Electric, a multinational electric engineering company, pledging more than $10,000 worth of food. Not long after, a truckload arrives from Nestle with cartons of Nestle products including Milo, Nestum cereal and Maggi noodles.

The food collected is helping thousands of individuals from the unemployed to the elderly and making a clear stance that no one in Singapore should go hungry.

This article was edited by Emma Gatehouse. Photos by Joy Wong.

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